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Becoming Lola – Changing Jobs

Becoming Lola – Changing Jobs

workingI quit my job. From the beginning the job sat in my gut, the idea that this job and are were a bad for me and my skills and ultimately, it wasn’t what I really wanted to do.  I kept at it making the most of it, even through the job functions that I really didn’t like, the tedious boring creation of certificates, dealing with members and their money questions, all the while trying to do my job well.

In my heart what I wanted most was to be a writer. If I couldn’t make it as an author at least I would be writing for a living. Nothing in my current job was heading me toward either road. I made the decision to quit.

This was a good decision even though there isn’t another job to go to because what I want is a consulting gig, three to six months writing technical manuals about software. I like the idea of starting and finishing a project and having time off. Time to do what I really want, finish my books. But in order to be submitted for the job, I need to be available immediately, hard to do with a full-time job.

Sometimes we need to put ourselves first, our needs and desires. And sometimes we have to trust in our vision and dreams and put some effort into what we really want. You can’t success in your goals if you don’t put any effort into them. Wishing and hoping doesn’t make it happen, hard word and time does.

On my way to becoming who and what I want to be takes determination and trust in my gut. It’s never let me down.

Something to Do This Weekend – Bring the Tissue Please

Something to Do This Weekend – Bring the Tissue Please

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I just played this game on Facebook. Ten books that left a lasting impression on you. Don’t think, just type. I thought I’d share the fun. Some are heavy, some aren’t as much, but they are definitely a good read if you’re looking for something to do this week. Go for it. Have some fun. After all it’s Friday Fun!

1) Kiss the Girls by James Patterson. There’s a scene in there with milk and a snake and a girl locked in an underground hell. I read the book years ago. It still haunts me.

2) The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Written by a woman suffering from a form a mental illness in the early 1900s. Her husband sent her away to live in a summer home. She was tormented by the yellow wallpaper in her bedroom and swore she saw a woman trapped inside the hideous pattern. They both felt trapped and I felt trapped as I read the story.

3) The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. I knew how the book was going to end, I knew it and yet I hoped they would kiss. I hoped he’d be okay. I cried when I finished the book.

4) Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume. It was the first time I was truly angry at a parent character in a book. It felt as though no one heard.

5) One Thousand Splendid Suns by Khalid Hosseini I had to put the book down I was shaking so hard. I could barely finish it.

6) The Diary of Anne Frank Besides crying at the nature of the book, when she says “Despite everything, I believe that people are really good at heart.” I marvel at her capcity for forgiveness.

7) Jepthe’s Daughter by Naomi Ragen. The father failed in his duties and left it up to his daughter to fix his mistakes and it almost cost her, her life. I seethed with anger for weeks.

8) The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides Abuse comes in all forms. This was horrible emotional abuse and even though you know the ending you still hope that they get there in time. It shook me up.

9) My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult. I read it after my daughter died. And I wondered would I have another baby just to save her life if that were an option. I still wonder.

10) Any Nancy Drew book or most Stephen King books. Both had an incredible influence on me and how I think about stories.

Title IX – Sports and the Year of the Woman

Title IX – Sports and the Year of the Woman

I’m a Sports Junkie Because…

I wish I were good at sports. I throw like a toddler, running hurts my back and my reflexes are incredibly slow. And because of that, I love watching female athletes excel in sports.

This article was originally written for a game day program for the Chicago Force, the all women’s Football team in Chicago. Different than other female football leagues, this one had not an ounce of silk, lace or bikinis. These women wore helmets and pads and left the game wrapped in ice. It was an honor to meet and speak with them about their experiences playing such a rough and predominantly male sport. And I very much enjoyed watching their commanding presence on the field.

History was Made

A twelve-year old girl walked through the practice facility of a high school and noticed the placards and accolades awarded to the many sports teams. Soon the girl became aware of how many more honors there are for the boy’s teams than for the girl’s. She innocently asked why. Observing the dates, I was fully aware, that the boys started playing in the 1940’s, while the girl’s teams were only given the right to exist starting in the 1970’s. Knowing what that meant, I smiled lightly. Because there was no reason for my youngest child to know anything other than anyone could participate in sports. Explaining Title IX opened her eyes to the lives of girls here age, those that came before her and their real struggles to achieve allowed the young girl, to participate the way she needed.

Title IX states that no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. June 23, 1972.

Excelling in Sports

In the decades since the passing of Title IX, women have made great strides in sports. In 2012, for the first time in Olympic history, all participating nations had a female athlete compete. In the same Olympic Games, the US team had more female athletes than male. In 2013, a woman started the Daytona 500 on the pole and finished 8th, the highest finish for a woman ever.

My personal guilty pleasure, American Ninja Warrior, saw for the first time, women, completing the same course as the men; the same obstacle course and winning. In 2014, Kaci Catanzaro was the first woman to complete the qualifying course, not once, but twice. While it might not be a professional sport, the event moved me, and inspired me. We are no longer limited by a smaller, petite body. We are strong, and in that knowledge we can accomplish what we set out to do when we are given the opportunity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfZFuw7a13E

 

In a time when it’s not only acceptable to play regardless of gender, it’s becoming the rule, not the exception. Women have only begun to take on the challenges associated with sports and now forty years after breakthrough legislation, it’s exciting to see what’s possible and what they can achieve.

 

 

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